Work in Progress III

The official opening date for the crypt project was yesterday and I still hadn’t finished all the work. But I think this project is going to be one of my best ever. So mixed feelings of complete failure and pride all at the same time over here today.

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15 Responses to “Work in Progress III”

  1. boatdog Says:

    great live feed of Gillian Welch on NPR right NOW: http://www.npr.org/series/newport-folk-festival/

  2. corndoggie Says:

    Looks good. Must be nice to work local.

  3. I’ve been spending some time at Hollywood Cemetery, this sort of fits my train of thought. Looking forward to this. Love the architecture of this cathedral.

  4. Anonymous Says:

    It looks great, but I’m a little disappointed you didn’t insist on naming the show “Tale from the Crypt.”

  5. Anonymous Says:

    OK, I gave it to y’all on a silver platter, but you all must be off your game:

    Or “Tail from the Crypt.” Where’s all this much-vaunted ribaldry fer chrissakes?

    Jood the Obskyooor

  6. Anonymous Says:

    This exhibit looks great and Boatdog should be very proud of it. It got me to thinking that I should write an essay or poem about the experience of growing up in Richmond surrounded by so many ghosts. When we leaped our bikes through the trenches did we give pause to the men who had suffered and died in them? Could they have dreamed that within a lifetime and a half their own hell on earth would be turned into our playground? When we wandered in the moonlight along the canal as teens quite altered and hyper-sensitized did we imagine the spectral forms of soldiers at bonfires heating train rails or hear the lilting, haunting, mournful melodies of harmonicas longing for home? When we made love on the sarcophogus of James Monroe did we titillate the more voyeuristic of the resident phantoms or simply offend the delicate sensibilities of the southern belles of Hollywood cemetary as they floated wraithlike by? Death was a constant companion in the time depicted by your exhibit. In no war before or since has our country, or according to your perspective, both of our countries, seen the like. We weren’t killing some dehumanized creature of a different color chattering in a strange tongue we were butchering our own cousins, brothers, fathers, our own kin. Americans began to attempt to commune with the dead at previously unseen levels. Many who perished in our old Richmond stomping grounds certainly had all of the requisite circumstances surrounding their deaths that some believe might cause a soul to refuse to continue their astral journey and persist in haunting where they fell. Young men in the bloom of life to whom death was simply an unacceptable surprise. The young woman taken suddenly by disease who had a wedding reception to host in order to create an oasis of charm and beauty while grisly death stalked her doorstep. It was not their time, there was too much to live for. The ghostly soul bent on continued bitter hatred to haunt revenge on those who callously stole everything in life including life itself. Yes, it is very fertile ground for phantasmic apparitions to inhabit our old haunts and if such things truly exist they most surely exist in old Richmond.

  7. Anonymous Says:

    Anonymous, take a tip from Anonymous: Use paragraphs. It makes your big ol’ block of fascinating and well-written text a lot more inviting (as in: people will want to read it).

    Love,
    Anonymous

  8. Willie Faulkner Says:

    Dear Anonymous,
    Using paragraph breaks
    and chopping up perfectly
    good run on sentences is
    for sissies Consider yourself lucky I bothered
    to include periods and Capitalization just kidding If I were to be a’riten fer an audience of more than four I
    would have tried to use them para graphs
    but I didn’t know I was being graded and sometimes you damned literary types can’t see the forest for the trees anyhoo
    watch out I may just up and die and come back to haunt you with writers block

  9. Willie Faulkner Says:

    BTW, I just tried to make inappropriate paragraphic indentations in the last comment and the algorithm that interprets the comments automatically removed them. I guess I could pre-write the comment in a word program then cut and paste it into the comment box but that would entail some forethought and remove the stream of consciousness aspect to my comments not to mention harshing my mellow. However, I do appreciate your input. At least you managed to read it all the way through.

  10. I break (and edit the second part) for Rotos:

    When we leaped our bikes through the trenches
    did we give pause to the men
    who had suffered and died in them?

    Could they have dreamed that within a lifetime
    and a half their own hell on earth
    would be turned into our playground?

    When we wandered in the moonlight along
    the canal as teens quite altered
    and hyper-sensitized did we imagine

    the spectral forms of soldiers at bonfires
    heating train rails or hear the lilting, haunting, mournful melodies
    of harmonicas longing for home?

    When we made love on the sarcophogus of James Monroe
    did we titillate the more voyeuristic
    of the resident phantoms or simply
    offend the delicate sensibilities of the southern belles
    of Hollywood cemetary as they floated wraithlike by?

    Death was a constant companion
    In no war before or since (have we) seen the like.
    We weren’t killing some – creature
    we were butchering our cousins, brothers, fathers.

    (We) began to commune with the dead
    ..Many who perished ….had all the circumstance…
    that some believe might cause a soul to refuse
    … their … journey and persist
    in haunting where they fell.

    Young men in the bloom
    …to whom death was … surprise
    The young woman taken … by disease
    who had a wedding reception to host
    ….oasis of charm and beauty…
    death stalked her doorstep

    It was not their time
    ……The ghostly soul bent
    on … bitter hatred to haunt
    revenge on those who callously stole
    ….fertile ground for phantasmic apparitions
    ….inhabit our haunts.

  11. Anonymous Says:

    See? Poetry!

    Thanks, BD — and of course to Anon for the material to begin with.

  12. Anonymous Says:

    A most excellent collaboration Rotedog! See? Way to pare it down to the essential!

  13. Thy will be done on the muse as it is in Texas?

  14. Anonymous Says:

    I thought that posting anonymously might give me a certain freedom from both reproach and praise but I suppose my peculiar style of writing has outed me again. It’s hard to slip one past Boatdog and Jude the Obscured. I hope my “big block” of letters and Boatdog’s fine poem ressurect some mysterious memories haunting the Musers. Maybe the Ghosts of Olde Richmond were what was eating Edgar Allan Poe. (Yes, I know he died in 1849) Now I should write about the strange goings on at Swannanoa.

  15. ThirdEyeGuy Says:

    Wrotedawg

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